Monday, 20 July 2015

Spidarlings (2015) trailer



With cameos from Lloyd Kaufman and the creator of Urotsukidoji, Salem Kapsaki's Spiderlings is the new colourful LGBT-musical that gives off amazing vibes! Three years in the making, with many a pitfall (like having their equipment stolen) along the way, Spidarlings is now at post-production stage. The filmmakers have come a long way to bring their vision to the screen and Spidarlings has great vibe to it, with some nods to Fassbinder, which is always nice!



Saturday, 18 July 2015

The New Flesh: 21st Century Horror Films A-Z, Volume 1

At last there is a writer (and an experienced one) with enough stamina and film culture to tackle the accumulated horror film output of the last two decades. Stuart Willis of SexGoreMutants fame has recently compiled the first volume of an ongoing horror genre encyclopedia which is to feature both mainstream and indie horror films made after the year 2000.
Available both as an e-book and a very handsome paperback, The New Flesh gives plenty of room to under-exposed and plain obscure DIY genre films which, while often rough around the edges, deserve more coverage then they're currently receiving.
UK indie horror scene is covered pretty well, with films by such underground luminaries as Bazz Hancher, S.N.Sibley, Jason Impey, Darren Ward and Lee Isserow reviewed. The no-budget 2008 surprise hit Colin is scheduled to be covered in Vol.2 of The New Flesh. Apart from homegrown horror, Willis dedicates a good few reviews to horror cinema legends' recent output with such films as Romero's Land of the Dead, Argento's Sleepless covered. Stuart WIllis also reviews key works from genre filmmakers who rose to prominence in the recent years - Eli Roth, Rob Zombie. The numerous recent re-makes and major releases haven't been left out, either. If, like me, you couldn't care less for mainstream horror, these reviews are easy enough to skip, and the current horror film picture wouldn't be complete had those films not been included.

The New Flesh is a valuable reference book which attempts the mammoth task of listing and analysing the main tendencies in recent horror cinema. Wary as I am of modern horror, I use The New Flesh  as my guide to avoid my finger burnt with some really iffy film. Stuart Willis has begun work on Vol.2 due out sometime in 2016. Here's to hoping there will be even more obscure indie horror listed in this upcoming second book.

Friday, 17 July 2015

Killer Fish (Antonio Margheriti, 1979)






In 1979, when Fulci unleashed his Zombie upon the world, D'Amato made his mark with Buio Omega and Argento was shooting Inferno, Antonio Margheriti gave us Killer Fish, a movie that trades basic logic and believability for travelogue footage and exploding miniatures. 


No good as a heist film and even worse as a horror film, Killer Fish is ripoff cinema at it's most dire and uninspired. Antonio Margheriti's obsession with exploding miniatures once again takes over, with the already lethargic action grinding to a halt to accommodate a minute or two of toy trains being blown to bits in slow-motion. Margheriti lingers on his effects work the way Lucio Fulci would linger on spilled guts and pierced eyeballs.



This stillborn Piranha clone shows Margheriti at his most workmanlike, indifferently handling the awful screenplay and leaving the potentially great cast to their own devices. No amount of outrageous period fashions or energetic disco from the De Angelis brothers can smooth things over. James Franciscus looks increasingly miserable as the film progresses, Karen Black, while looking great in diving gear, is given to fits of unmotivated hysteria. No matter whether he's courting Margot Hemingway or trying to survive piranha attacks, Lee Majors remains stone-faced throughout. The dialogues are atrocious and although there's some low-budget action, it's impossible to care for any of it. Italian exploitation cinema has given the world a number of classics as well as countless diamonds in the rough. Killer Fish is not among either of these. To see an entertaining off-the-wall Italian killer fish movie, go for Creatures from the Abyss/Plancton.
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